Four Not-to-Miss Data Stories- June 3rd, 2013

not-to-miss-linksUse your mobile phone. Use your tablet. Use your electricity. Use the internet, the ER, a medical laboratory, a gym. Generate lots of data all about yourself. Who can use that data? Well … probably not you.

If My Data Is an Open Book, Why Can’t I Read It?
(For a cooperative effort toward mutually beneficial solutions, check out #wethedata: for the people, by the people. For a list of companies supporting greater transparency in privacy, see Future of Privacy Forum supporters.)

Facebook tells a visual story of how members exchange music. It’s an amazing, artistic topography of music shared–and think of the mountains of data that went into creating it. Is there a clever marketing way to use this data? Folks are hoping so. Maybe you have a suggestion.

Facebook’s Mesmerizing 3D Music Map: Can Artists, Brands & Developers Use the Data?
(Nothing’s wrong with your speakers; there’s no audio track.)

Mapping Music on Facebook from Facebook Stories on Vimeo.

Back to Google’s “honest” maps. Suppose the only maps you see are based on what you are most likely to choose? Google Maps plans to serve up personalized maps that don’t show every feature–say, something you might want to do on an adventurous day–because that’s not what you normally choose based on all the data Google has on you. It’s a brilliant use of data for the purpose of targeted advertising. But some wonder what happens to your experience of life when the use of your data offers up thirty-six flavors of ice cream where one’s vanilla, the flavor you tend to pick, and the other thirty-five are … vanilla?

My Map or Yours? Google’s plan to personalize maps could end public space as we know it

Personality profiling gives businesses a far better idea what potential customers will respond to. But giving every potential customer a personality test is not feasible. What’s a business to do to improve conversion rates on advertising campaigns? Turn to Twitter.

No Hiding Place: A Plan to Assess Your Personality From Your Tweets